• Welcome, Robert. Great to have you with us!

  • Janet Agostino helped a lot of people with her podcast (CGC 019) on learning classical guitar and she is back to discuss ensemble work with classical guitar.

    Janet and I were both teaching at the Sydney Summer […]

    • This podcast has made me less frightened to join an ensemble. I haven’t played in an ensemble in over 10 years since I was in college. I did not have a very good experience. There is a guitar orchestra in the city where I work, so maybe I should join.

      I think it would make sense for Simon to publish all of the duets from the courses in a single book. It could be a “Progressive Duets.”

  • Hi everyone

    I am down in Sydney Australia right now teaching at the Sydney Classical Guitar Summer School. We are in day four of a five day event and I managed to corral five of our members who are attending the Summer School.

    As I have said before, it is one of my greatest pleasures and privileges to meet members from CGC in real…[Read more]

  • Hi everyone

    I am down in Sydney Australia right now teaching at the Sydney Classical Guitar Summer School. We are in day four of a five day event and I managed to corral five of our members who are attending the Summer School.

    As I have said before, it is one of my greatest pleasures and privileges to meet members from CGC in real…[Read more]

  • Hi everyone

    I am down in Sydney Australia right now teaching at the Sydney Classical Guitar Summer School. We are in day four of a five day event and I managed to corral five of our members who are attending the Summer School.

    As I have said before, it is one of my greatest pleasures and privileges to meet members from CGC in real…[Read more]

  • Hi John,

    You have degree mixed up with something else.

    A degree is assigned to a note relative to the other notes in that scale.

    So in the C Major scale. The C is the first degree, the D is the second degree of the scale and B is the seventh.

    In G Major, G is the first degree, D is the Fifth etc.

    Does this make sense?

  • Hi Ian,

    Funny you should mention the SMART goals I have just been reading a book by Charles Duhigg where he talks all about them!

    Nothing new under the sun…

  • Hi John,

    Great questions.

    The first question is referring to enharmonics. This simply means that a single pitch can have two names. The note Bb could be called A# or even C double flat! (not that we would ever actually use this).

    In standard harmony pieces we tend to stick to the key we are in when referring to sharps and flats. If you look at…[Read more]

  • Hi Lucas,

    I am traveling in Australia right now, but if you write to support@classicalguitarcorner.com with your questions I will get back to you as soon as I can.

    Regards,
    Simon

  • Hi everyone! I just finished a long meeting with Dave Belcher, which was a wonderful way to close out the year. I am in Asheville NC right now and Dave also lives in North Carolina, so we took the opportunity to meet up for the first time in a long while.

    We spent a lot of our time talking about how we can make the site better for all of you,…[Read more]

  • Simon replied to the topic Hello from Spain!!! in the forum Introduce yourself 1 month ago

    Bienvenidos Fernando!

    Great to have you with us.

  • Simon replied to the topic Rolling Chords in the forum Technique Questions 1 month ago

    Hi Tom,

    Just to add to the discussion. Avoid making any substantial changes to your right hand position in order to roll the chord. If you like you can practice playing the block chord, then progress to gently releasing the digits independently, like they were falling off the string p i m a. Then, with that relaxed mindset, speed up the…[Read more]

  • Simon replied to the topic Right Hand Fingering in the forum Technique Questions 1 month ago

    Hi Rahul,

    There are several big questions in there and without seeing the exact edition of Fur Elise it is tough for me to answer but I will give it my best.

    The thumb can be repeated and is usually used on the bass strings (strings 4 5 and 6) when playing melodies on the treble strings (strings 1 2 and 3) we usually use i and m in alternation.…[Read more]

  • Yes, I think rest stroke with the fingers, rest stroke with the thumb, and rasgueado would all be good techniques to push your instrument to its limit.

  • Hi Juan-Carlos,

    Yes I think many of the 20th and 21st Century pieces have very specific uses of dynamics. Works by Leo Brouwer, Roland Dyens, Phillip Houghton, William Walton (Bagatelles), Benjamin Britten (Nocturnal), and Luciano Berio (Sequenza) are all good examples of specifically chosen dynamic contrasts.

    Music that doesn’t have so many…[Read more]

  • Hi John,

    Sight reading, working on two or three pieces so that you are very comfortable for a lesson or performance, and as for the ensemble work I am planning to have materials that in the public domain available for participants to work on from March onwards.

    As for duets, I think this would be a great idea and perhaps you can line up a duet…[Read more]

  • Let’s get one thing straight… the classical guitar is not a loud instrument.
    A trumpet is loud, a taiko drum is loud, the crosstown bus outside my window is loud, but the elegant classical guitar is not. You […]

    • Hi Simon.

      Great article.

      Oddly, I only started playing with more dynamic range when it was pointed out to me that frorte really meant strong and piano meant soft. Naturally, strong often includes playing loudly, but somehow I always respond to strong but have remember to play loud. I have seen a few scores where the dynamic is marked loud rather than forte.

      Similarly, allegro means lively, not fast.

      Regards

    • Play even louder then you think you can
      but
      Remember

      Keep your hands relaxed

    • This article is just what I need to remind me to push for #10. I will print it out and post it in my practice room.

      Thank you.

    • Simon would you suggest a piece/s that exemplify all the different “volumes” and their contrasts? Thanks

      • Hi Juan-Carlos,

        Yes I think many of the 20th and 21st Century pieces have very specific uses of dynamics. Works by Leo Brouwer, Roland Dyens, Phillip Houghton, William Walton (Bagatelles), Benjamin Britten (Nocturnal), and Luciano Berio (Sequenza) are all good examples of specifically chosen dynamic contrasts.

        Music that doesn’t have so many instructions in the score include Renaissance, Baroque, and Classical music. Often the composers would assume a certain stylistic knowledge from the player instead of dictating all of the dynamic markings on the score.

    • Yes, I think rest stroke with the fingers, rest stroke with the thumb, and rasgueado would all be good techniques to push your instrument to its limit.

    • Thanks for the comment, Timothy. Great story from your studies with Satoh!

      Peace,

      Dave B (CGC team)

    • Thanks for the comment, Derek! That’s a great point, and I suspect you’re right that some guitars will play more loudly—in fact some instruments have been built with the express interest of being able to “cut through” the mix with other, louder instruments. And the blooming period on a guitar top certainly can be a factor as well. Still, one will need to develop the technical side of playing more loudly, of having a bigger and fuller sound, and one’s guitar can only take one so far. Thanks again and Happy Holiday wishes to you!

      Peace,

      Dave B (CGC team)

  • Just had our first submission from Changhee (all the way from Kenya!)

    If you are up for submitting please do so today, as I was hoping to get the podcast done for tomorrow.

    Simon

  • Hi everyone,

    Someone asked me about my goals for 2017 the other day… and I drew a total blank. So, I am planning to do the next podcast on goal setting for the coming year. I thought it would be great to have some members share their goals for 2017 and then I can discuss the goals and maybe offer some advice on the podcast.

    I have no idea…[Read more]

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